Category Archives: Technology

Snapchat’s new camera glasses cost $150 and come in 3 new colors


Snap unveiled a new version of its Spectacles camera glasses on Thursday. The latest model is a bit slimmer, $20 more expensive, can take photos, offers prescription lenses for an additional fee, and is water resistant.

Snap, Snapchat’s parent company, launched a new version of its camera glasses, Spectacles, on Thursday. The new model is slightly slimmer, can take photos, and they’re water-resistant, Snap said in a release.

“Tap the button to record video with new and improved audio, and now, you can press and hold to take a photo! Snaps you capture will transfer to Snapchat up to four times faster, and always in HD,” according to the Snap release.

Read more at Business Insider

This Cryptocurrency Could Save The World


The prospect of shifting gears from simply making money to being paid for performing scientific research with your computer is more than just enticing for most tech enthusiasts — and the idea is catching on fast

When most people first get interested in cryptocurrency, it’s for practical reasons — they’re looking for more control over their financial transactions, they’re intrigued by the idea of digital currency, they’re impressed by the price action of the trading markets — and these reasons all have one thing in common: people want to make money.

At a base level, the initial appeal of cryptocurrency is mining. Mining cryptos is like mining for gold with your computer — you research the asset to find the most profitable, you purchase tools for the mining itself, and you pay a fee towards the cost of workers (in this case, the power company), all in the hopes of making enough in return to claim a profit. The problem people immediately face, however, is how difficult it is to make a profit when the cost of equipment and electricity is so high. To make matters worse, all of that computational power is only going to one place: your pocket.

But what if you could donate your processing power while also making a profit in return? And what if that processing power were given to solving some of the most complex problems in the scientific community, problems that if solved could bring humanity to the next level such as mapping the Milky Way Galaxy, curing cancer, or finding life on other planets? Well, there’s a cryptocurrency for that, and it’s called Gridcoin.

Gridcoin is a cryptocurrency that rewards its users for contributing to scientific research through a software program called BOINC, or Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing, which was developed by the University of California, Berkeley to help the SETI project, or search for extraterrestrial intelligence. While it isn’t worth much at the moment (about 15 cents per coin), the price has indeed increased over the past two years, making it a contender against other low-priced cryptocurrencies that have been around longer. What’s more is that Gridcoin’s price, along with many other major cryptos, has increased due to Bitcoin’s increase in price, and is now beginning a life of its own much like Ethereum, Ethereum Classic, Bitcoin Cash and other alternative currencies have in the past few years.

Current projections for Gridcoin are pointing towards an average of about 25 cents for coin for the beginning of 2018, and upwards of $2 – $3 by the end of the year. That means that buying Gridcoin now may even be more profitable than mining for the moment. You can purchase Gridcoin on a number of exchanges, including Poloniex and Bittrex, among others.

However, if you are interested in turning your unused processing power into a contributor to the BOINC network and earn your Gridcoin, you can get started by following the instructions on the Gridcoin website.

Use Your Old Smartphone As A Free Web Server


There are all sorts of free web server apps, which are useful for hosting your own website from home without having to pay anything. Of course, you are limited to the resources your old smartphone has, but there is a surprising amount of services you can provide even without a lot of storage, such as a PHP server, a SQL database server, an FTP server, and even an ssh server. This can prove to be very powerful if done right!

windows phone is dead

 

Recent News for Windows Phone
X
  • Using Your Windows Phone For Media Only
  • Make Your Windows Phone a Gaming Phone


    Of course you could use your phone for gaming as well as other things, but a lot of apps can begin to clutter your phone up, and you only have so much room and memory. Separating your gaming from your normal everyday use can really help organize your phone usage, and your life.

    If you like to play games on your phone, you may want to install your games on your old Windows phone only, especially if you find yourself only gaming on your phone at specific times of the day such as at night before bed or while waiting somewhere during a daily routine.

    windows phone is dead

    Recent News for Windows Phone
    X
  • Make Your Windows Phone a Gaming Phone
  • Using Your Windows Phone For Media Only


    If you end up not using your Windows Phone as an actual phone anymore because you bought a new one, you don’t need to let it collect dust on the shelf

    You can still use it for all sorts of media including ebooks, music and video on long car trips or in bed. Just because you don’t put cell phone service on it doesn’t mean it can’t still be used over wifi.

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    Tekoso Media Provides Web Hosting For Small Businesses


    For Immediate Release –

    Tekoso Media Web Hosting

    Internet company Tekoso Media has recently begun offering web hosting services including shared hosting, cloud hosting and storage, VPS hosting and dedicated servers for both Windows and Linux platforms. Prices are very cheap and come with generous software packages, security and cutting edge computer technology.

    Also servers in the shared, VPS and managed server packages come with cPanel and a whole host of free add-ons that every internet marketer needs for their launch, including ticket systems, multiple email accounts, billing systems and membership functionality.

    WordPress Hosting at Tekoso Media

    WordPress is obviously a part of what they offer, but they go the extra mile by offering wordpress hosting at a discounted rate as well. On top of that, their point and click, drag and drop website creators and integrations make it very easy to get up and running within minutes.

    If you’re launching a new product or service, or even hosting a blog network for search engine optimization such as authority blogs, Tekoso Web Hosting is your best bet for getting started fast and cheaply. For just a few bucks you can have lightning speed servers, more hard drive space and RAM than you’ll ever need and plenty of bandwidth, all without breaking the bank the way you would with competing web hosting providers.

    Try Tekoso and take them for a test drive. They even offer a thirty day money back guarantee on any server that is unsatisfactory. This offer may be limited, so check them out today!

    Learn more about Tekoso Web Hosting at tekoso.com on Youtube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wu1Qo8e6hvU

    Why North Korea’s nuclear threat must be taken more seriously than ever


    Graham Ong-Webb, Nanyang Technological University

    During what was the 2017 Easter weekend for most of the world, North Koreans celebrated the “Day of the Sun”. It was the 105th birthday of the country’s late founding leader and “eternal president” Kim Il-sung (1912-1994). The Conversation

    Thousands of soldiers, military vehicles and, most notably, various ballistic missiles were paraded for the inspection of current supreme leader Kim Jong-Un (Kim Il-sung’s grandson).

    But it wasn’t the parade that signalled North Korea’s belligerence; numerous other countries hold military parades to mark some significant occasion or another.

    Instead, what was clearly aggressive was the presentation of a mock-up video of the country’s ballistic missiles destroying an American city during a national musical performance.

    This video is the most visceral expression yet of Pyongyang’s intentions. Its telecast was likely timed to coincide with the expected arrival of the US Navy’s aircraft carrier, the USS Carl Vinson, and its accompanying fleet of warships in Korean waters.

    Inching closer

    On April 8, US President Donald Trump and other American officials told the media that the Carl Vinson had been ordered to make its way towards the Korean peninsula. The likely plan was to demonstrate American resolve in managing the crisis that North Korea’s nuclear weapons program has created.

    Subsequent revelations that the warship was actually heading south for exercises with the Australian Navy at the time showed a series of blunders in internal communication. But the fact that the Carl Vinson has arrived off Korean waters two weeks later does not change the prospect of a military conflict between North Korea and the United States.

    The key question is whether North Korea does have nuclear weapons that it can readily use against the United States and its regional allies, South Korea and Japan. It’s still unlikely North Korea has the current capability to launch a nuclear-tipped intercontinental ballistic missile that can destroy an American city.

    North Korea’s scientists have yet to master the technology to build missiles that can traverse this distance and to construct warheads that can survive re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere after space flight.

    But years of testing has allowed North Korea to inch closer to getting right the extremely demanding science of building and launching viable intercontinental nuclear weapons. And this is why the United States is against further testing, to the point that the Trump administration seems serious about justifying pre-emptive strikes on the basis of further nuclear and missile tests.

    What is of immediate concern is that previous tests have led to North Korea being able to achieve the relatively easier requirements of building workable medium-range ballistic missiles, with small enough warheads, to strike American bases in South Korea and Japan. These have about 80,000 US military personnel in total.

    Approaching catastrophe

    North Korea may already have as many 20 nuclear warheads that are small enough to be carried on its Nodong (or Rodong-1) medium-range missiles that can reach these bases. And the Trump administration seems to not want to risk the lives of American soldiers by assuming that North Korea doesn’t already have this nuclear capability.

    The cost of that mistake would be the lives of not just 80,000 American military personnel but also countless South Korean and Japanese lives as well. In fact, a North Korean nuclear attack, which will likely develop into war, can be expected to create a humanitarian, environmental and economic catastrophe that will set back the international community.

    This is what’s immediately at stake for everyone. And it explains why the United States is putting pressure on China, as an ally of North Korea, to influence it to stop its nuclear weapons program.

    But if China and other countries fail to stop North Korea building nuclear weapons, the United States will feel pressured to use military force to destroy whatever nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles sites it can locate by satellite surveillance.

    The decision to divert the Carl Vinson to waters near the Korean peninsula may also be driven by new intelligence on North Korea’s nuclear threat. The challenge is that sending an American naval armada towards North Korea risks triggering the very nuclear attack against US bases that the Trump administration is trying to avoid in the first place.

    This could explain why the administration said it was sending its naval vessels two weeks ago when it really did so later. It may have been to test North Korea’s attitude without escalating the situation by the actual presence of American naval forces that could trigger military action by Kim Jong-Un’s regime.

    A worrying stand-off

    Why would North Korea want to use nuclear weapons against American bases in Northeast Asia in the first place? It is helpful to remember that, technically, North and South Korea have been at war since 1950 (the Korean War ended in 1953 with an armistice rather than peace). And that the United States has chosen to provide military assistance to the South to help protect it from any aggression by the North.

    North Korea may have a very large army of about one million soldiers. South Korea effectively has half that number. Although the majority of South Korea’s able-bodied male citizens may contribute to a military reserve of a few million soldiers, mobilising them in time to respond to a conflict is another question and their role is often excluded from analyses.

    As such, the American military personnel and the superior equipment, aircraft and ships that they operate provide the South with a better chance of avoiding defeat should war break out.

    Pyongyang’s intention in using nuclear weapons would be to destroy these American bases to remove the advantage they give to South Korea’s national defence. This is why the threat of nuclear use, especially by a more brazen regime under Kim Jong-Un, needs to be taken very seriously.

    Such is the current quagmire as the world waits to see how the geopolitics of the Korean peninsula will unfold over the next few months. And as strategists and policymakers scramble to find other approaches for halting North Korea’s growing nuclear threat.

    Graham Ong-Webb, Research Fellow, S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Nanyang Technological University

    Facebook’s new anti-fake news strategy is not going to work – but something else might


    Have you seen some “tips to spot fake news” on your Facebook newsfeed recently? The Conversation

    Over the past year, the social media company has been scrutinized for influencing the US presidential election by spreading fake news (propoganda). Obviously, the ability to spread completely made-up stories about politicians trafficking child sex slaves and imaginary terrorist attacks with impunity is bad for democracy and society.

    Something had to be done.

    Enter Facebook’s new, depressingly incompetent strategy for tackling fake news. The strategy has three, frustratingly ill-considered parts.

    New products

    The first part of the plan is to build new products to curb the spread of fake news stories. Facebook says it’s trying “to make it easier to report a false news story” and find signs of fake news such as “if reading an article makes people significantly less likely to share it.”

    It will then send the story to independent fact checkers. If fake, the story “will get flagged as disputed and there will be a link to a corresponding article explaining why.”

    This sounds pretty good, but it won’t work.

    If non-experts could tell the difference between real news and fake news (which is doubtful), there would be no fake news problem to begin with.

    What’s more, Facebook says: “We cannot become arbiters of truth ourselves — it’s not feasible given our scale, and it’s not our role.” Nonsense.

    Facebook is like a megaphone. Normally, if someone says something horrible into the megaphone, it’s not the megaphone company’s fault. But Facebook is a very special kind of megaphone that listens first and then changes the volume.

    The company’s algorithms largely determine both the content and order of your newsfeed. So if Facebook’s algorithms spread some neo-Nazi hate speech far and wide, yes, it is the company’s fault.

    Worse yet, even if Facebook accurately labels fake news as contested, it will still affect public discourse through “availability cascades.”

    Each time you see the same message repeated from (apparently) different sources, the message seems more believable and reasonable. Bold lies are extremely powerful because repeatedly fact-checking them can actually make people remember them as true.

    These effects are exceptionally robust; they cannot be fixed with weak interventions such as public service announcements, which brings us to the second part of Facebook’s strategy: helping people make more informed decisions when they encounter false news.

    Helping you help yourself

    Facebook is releasing public service announcements and funding the “news integrity initiative” to help “people make informed judgments about the news they read and share online”.

    This – also – doesn’t work.

    A vast body of research in cognitive psychology concerns correcting systematic errors in reasoning such as failing to perceive propaganda and bias. We have known since the 1980s that simply warning people about their biased perceptions doesn’t work.

    Similarly, funding a “news integrity” project sounds great until you realise the company is really talking about critical thinking skills.

    Improving critical thinking skills is a key aim of primary, secondary and tertiary education. If four years of university barely improves these skills in students, what will this initiative do? Make some Youtube videos? A fake news FAQ?

    Funding a few research projects and “meetings with industry experts” doesn’t stand a chance to change anything.

    Disrupting economic incentives

    The third prong of this non-strategy is cracking down on spammers and fake accounts, and making it harder for them to buy advertisements. While this is a good idea, it’s based on the false premise that most fake news comes from shady con artists rather than major news outlets.

    You see, “fake news” is Orwellian newspeak — carefully crafted to mean a totally fabricated story from a fringe outlet masquerading as news for financial or political gain. But these stories are the most suspicious and therefore the least worrisome. Bias and lies from public figures, official reports and mainstream news are far more insidious.

    And what about astrology, homeopathy, psychics, anti-vaccination messages, climate change denial, intelligent design, miracles, and all the rest of the irrational nonsense bandied about online? What about the vast array of deceptive marketing and stealth advertising that is core to Facebook’s business model?

    As of this writing, Facebook doesn’t even have an option to report misleading advertisements.

    What is Facebook to do?

    Facebook’s strategy is vacuous, evanescent, lip service; a public relations exercise that makes no substantive attempt to address a serious problem.

    But the problem is not unassailable. The key to reducing inaccurate perceptions is to redesign technologies to encourage more accurate perception. Facebook can do this by developing a propaganda filter — something like a spam filter for lies.

    Facebook may object to becoming an “arbiter of truth”. But coming from a company that censors historic photos and comedians calling for social justice, this sounds disingenuous.

    Nonetheless, Facebook has a point. To avoid accusations of bias, it should not create the propaganda filter itself. It should simply fund researchers in artificial intelligence, software engineering, journalism and design to develop an open-source propaganda filter that anyone can use.

    Why should Facebook pay? Because it profits from spreading propaganda, that’s why.

    Sure, people will try to game the filter, but it will still work. Spam is frequently riddled with typos, grammatical errors and circumlocution not only because it’s often written by non-native English speakers but also because the weird writing is necessary to bypass spam filters.

    If the propaganda filter has a similar effect, weird writing will make the fake news that slips through more obvious. Better yet, an effective propaganda filter would actively encourage journalistic best practices such as citing primary sources.

    Developing a such a tool won’t be easy. It could take years and several million dollars to refine. But Facebook made over US$8 billion last quarter, so Mark Zuckerberg can surely afford it.

    Paul Ralph, Senior Lecturer in Computer Science, University of Auckland